• Field Notes A blog compiling the writings of
    the Heronswood Team

Heronswood Biodiversity Audit

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(06.30.20)

A GARDEN NEEDS HEROES

Y’know, I’d like a sidekick. Now, I’m not actually thinking of a person who’d just tag along and act as my own shadow, but an entirely different organism. Gardening is often a sweaty task, especially …

Horse Chestnut

Onwards and Upwards; Horse Chestnuts

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When life gives you lemons, you make lemonade, and Heronswood has been learning to love lemonade. We’ve had some difficult months with greatly reduced staff and few or our excellent volunteers on hand. With the garden closed, we’ve also missed …

Heronswood Biodiversity Audit

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(06.14.20)

OF BUGS AND BATS

Days are becoming longer as the solstice approaches, and with additional light, plants are able to grow to their chloroplasts’ content. Long days also bring greater warmth, yet night does eventually come to blanket the …

Insignis and in Health

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From the Mountains of Vietnam to Kitsap Peninsula

The mild climate of the maritime Pacific Northwest provides ideal growing conditions for a significant assemblage of species in the genus Magnolia. Heronswood Garden boasts a respectable- and growing- collection, both deciduous …

Local Talent

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At Heronswood, we tend to look toward distant horizons. Our plant collections contain exciting species from around the world, Tasmania to Turkey, Myanmar to Mexico, Chile to China. And yet, the Pacific Northwest, and Washington State in particular, has much …

Warp and Weave

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Troubling the Star

It seems at times, as of lately, that some terrible mistake has occurred in the laboratory and a mixture of chemicals never intended to meet have met. There is a general roil to simply living at the …

Paris quadrifolia

Quadrophilia

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The word “quarantine” has been around for centuries, but now joins our current lexicon of coronavirus catchphrases: social distancing, flattening the curve, new normal, PPE, home schooling (should that be hyphenated? Not sure, ask the kids). Its origins trace back …

Keeping It Green

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This week’s wander through Heronswood’s horticultural delights will focus on green flowers and is not, as the title suggests, a homage to a well-known and much respected local nursery. Green flowers have fascinated me since childhood, in part because my …

Seasonal Liturgy

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Rites of Spring

When I was a few years younger, and traveled a great deal more, I spent a considerable amount of my life in Japan. Habitually, for no other reason than familiarity with the rail system and an inexpensive …

Heronswood Biodiversity Audit

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(05.03.20)

A SLIME OF PASSION

There is no shortage of plants at Heronswood to appreciate for one reason or another. Luscious camellia flowers bloom from winter into spring, shady beds of full hosta leaves cradle water droplets by summer, and …

Pulsatilla vulgaris

Arcadia

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Seeking the Ideal

How we wish to believe that an ideal exists, the garden of our minds, accurate and precise. It rains at night, just so softly, yet still it soaks the earth. Varmints live off weeds that are rarely …

Heronswood Biodiversity Audit

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(04.26.20)

CELEBRATING SALAMANDERS

When I reminisce of moments from my childhood, I often return to time spent in the backyard woods of the Midwest, poking around under decomposing logs or flat rocks in a shallow stream bed. Discovering what was …

Pollen

Pollen; The Agony and the Ecstasy

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The Mystery, Miracle and Misery of Palynologenics

Above all else, know thine enemy. As you sneeze and hack through a cloying cloud of gilded vexation, take a moment to marvel in the science of palynology. The study of pollen has …

Heronswood Biodiversity Audit

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(04.21.20)

WOODPECKERS of NORTH KITSAP

Art often imitates life, and when it comes to music, we have nature to thank for inspiration of delightful melodies. If the Pacific tree frog of which I waxed poetic in a previous article for …

Heronswood Biodiversity Audit

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(04.14.20)

LOCAL BUTTERFLIES of EARLY SPRING – Part II

There are certainly larger butterflies to observe in early to mid-spring, and the most common among them are from the Brushfoot family (Nymphalidae), notably the Tortoiseshells (Aglais and Nymphalis genera), and …

Pink Moons and Spring Diversions

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The Garden, at Last, Through the Lens

As we all are quite aware, trying to get from point A to point B and then on to C in a garden during the spring takes herculean efforts. In a span of …

Heronswood Biodiversity Audit

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(04.07.20)

LOCAL BUTTERFLIES of EARLY SPRING – Part I

I consider myself a horticulturist, and in the grand scheme of classifying professions, this title falls under the umbrella of science. Saying the word “science” to many people might immediately prompt …

Heronswood Biodiversity Audit

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(04.04.20)

PACIFIC TREE FROG / PACIFIC CHORUS FROG (Pseudacris regilla)

For gardeners in the Pacific Northwest, spring holds much promise of potential. All the toils from the season prior are now eagerly anticipated as daylight arrives earlier and brings with …

Mahonia oiwakensis

On Shy Days, A Generous Gift

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A Season of Giving

It remains a pity that so many of the treasures found in our collection at Heronswood come into their finest after the garden has closed for the year. Of those that shine brightest in mid-November through …

 
 
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